LABOR-ASSIST ORGANIZATIONS REAFFIRM THEIR SUPPORT FOR AGRICULTURAL WORKERS’ CALL FOR A CONSUMER BOYCOTT OF DRISCOLL’S PRODUCTS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD

Submitted by hermandadmex on June 5, 2017


#Boycot Driscoll's

LABOR-ASSIST ORGANIZATIONS REAFFIRM THEIR SUPPORT FOR AGRICULTURAL WORKERS’ CALL FOR A CONSUMER BOYCOTT OF DRISCOLL’S PRODUCTS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) and the Hermandad Mexicana “la original,” both known as labor-assist organizations, make a call to broaden the support for the National Democratic Independent Union of Agricultural Workers in their invitation to consumers to boycott Driscoll’s berry products until the company, and its contracting employers, sign a collective bargaining agreement with the Mexican union.

“We reaffirm our support of the National Democratic Independent Union of Agricultural Workers in their struggle to obtain a collective bargaining agreement with their individual employers and Driscoll’s, the largest purchaser and producer of berries in North America; and the boycott that the union has sustained since 2015 to secure a contract for its 80,000 members,” declared Al Rojas, leader of LCLAA.

“Since the founding of Hermandad Mexicana “la original” in 1951 by union leaders and Mexican immigrant workers, we have supported the demands and struggles of Mexican workers on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border to improve their conditions of life and work,” offered Nativo Lopez, of Hermandad Mexicana “la original.” “Today Hermandad declares that it will re-double its efforts to broaden the consumer boycott of Driscoll’s products throughout the U.S. until the company concludes a contract with the farmworkers of Mexico,” he added.

Both organizations expressed concern that a small organization based in Burlington, Washington, under the name of Familias Unidas, has signed an agreement with the employer of less than 400 farmworkers, Sakuma Brothers Farm, a major producer under contract with Driscoll’s, and intends on renouncing the boycott of Driscoll’s. This group had previously agreed with the National Democratic Independent Union of Agricultural Workers, based in San Quintin, Baja California, Mexico, not to conclude a separate agreement with Driscoll’s until all farmworkers were covered under a collective bargaining agreement.

“Familias Unidas’s anticipated announcement to renounce the boycott of Driscoll’s will have the effect of dividing the farmworker movement and creating confusion with the consuming public,” stated Rojas and Lopez. “For this reason, we intend on broadening the consumer boycott of Driscoll’s berries until all farmworkers on both sides of the border enjoy a contract,” they concluded.

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